growing practices

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Mineralized produce

Expanding the knowledge and work of Dr. Carey Reams with our more than 30 years of experience farming in New York’s lower Catskills, Mountain Sweet Berry honors the commitment to growing “mineralized produce,” using healthy soil chemistry.

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We build our soil using a variety of minerals, compost, cover crops, kelps, humates, appropriate tillage and crop rotation. With healthy, highly productive soil we produce food that is both the most delicious and nutrient-dense.  

 

As Dr. Reams said,

“A farm is only as rich as its soil.” 

Photo: Kate Galassi

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catskills microclimate

Located along the Beaverkill River about 100 miles Northwest of NYC and 2000 feet above sea level, the selection of crops and varieties we grow thrive in the cooler Catskill nights.

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When the temperature drops into the 50s, as it does each night during our summers, it concentrates the sugar in the berries; this is why we call them “Mountain Sweet.”

Mountain sweet

Photo: Kate Galassi

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brix

“Brix” is the measurement of the percentage of sugar in a plant; higher sugar content also means higher mineral content.

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Produce with high Brix readings are more nutritious and have a more complex, fuller flavor. 

 

They have a natural shine, hold up over time and you can perceive the nutrient density when you eat it.

It's also a great way for stirring up healthy competition amongst friends:

Checkout NY Magazine's article,

"The Sweetest Carrot">